Iranti-org is a media
advocacy organisation
that defends the rights of Lesbians, Transgender
and Intersex persons
in Africa. 

 

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GLOSSARY
  • Ally ~ A person who supports and honors sexual diversity, acts accordingly to challenge homophobic and heterosexist remarks and behaviors, and is willing to explore and understand these forms of bias within him or herself.
  • Agender ~ is a term used to describe a person without gender. This person can be any physical sex, but their body does not necessarily correspond with their lack of gender identity. Often, these people are not concerned with their physical sex, but some may seek to look androgynous. Sometimes, an agendered person is also neutrois. Synonymous for non-gender/non-conforming
  • Ambiphilia ~ refers to sexual attraction to intersex or transgender
  • Androgyny ~ A rejection of the binary model (see below) and advocacy of gender fluidity. Many believe gender stereotyping pressurises us from infancy to conform to behaviour patterns associated with our perceived gender.
  • AQMMN ~ African LGBTIQ Media Makers Network (AQMMN).
  • Asexual ~ Someone who does not experience sexual attraction towards other people, and who identifies as asexual. May still have romantic, emotional, affectional, or relational attractions to other people.
  • Bear ~ However, the word ‘bear’ means many things to different people, even within the bear movement. Many men who do not have one or all of these characteristics define themselves as bears, making the term a very loose one. ‘Bear’ is often defined as more of an attitude and a sense of comfort with natural masculinity and bodies, often with facial hair.
  • Bicurious ~ A curiosity about having sexual relations with a same gender/sex person.
  • Biphobia ~ Fear of, hatred of, or discomfort with people who are bisexual.
  • Bisexual ~ A person (male or female) who has significant sexual and or romantic attractions to both males and females or someone who identifies as a member of this community.
  • Boydyke ~ A lesbian or bisexual woman, who chooses the "dyke" label to identify with that group's politics and community, and also identifies as boyish or as a boy. It can be a transgender identity in which a person stands with one foot in the "boy" world and one in the "dyke" world, or simply an adjective for someone who performs “butchness” in a certain way.
  • Butch ~ Used as an adjective ~ "I'm butch" or "I'm a butch woman" as opposed to a noun "I am a Butch". The term is used to describe lesbians, gay men and bisexuals. It can be used to describe straight men and women also, though this is less common. It is most commonly used to describe women who take on or embody culturally defined masculine traits. As with anyone who displays “masculine traits, a self-identified butch woman may or may not be sexually aggressive.
  • Camp ~ An affected or effeminate mode of male comportment and/or behaviour; a gay stereotype. 'Behaving in a camp way'
  • Cisgender ~ A term for individuals whose gender identity generally matches with that assigned for their physical sex. In other words, a person who does not identify as transgender. Derived from the Latin root “cis,” meaning “on the same side.”
  • Closet ~ Used as slang for the state of not publicizing one's sexual identity, keeping it private, living an outwardly heterosexual life while identifying as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender, or not being forthcoming about one's identity. At times, being in the closet also means not wanting to admit one's sexual identity to oneself. 'He is in the closet, he is closetted'
  • Coming Out ~ To disclose one's own sexual identity or gender identity. It can mean telling others or it can refer to the time when a person comes out to him/herself by discovering or admitting that their sexual or gender identity is not what was previously assumed. Some people think of coming out as a larger system of oppression of LGBT people- that an LGBT person needs to come out at all shows that everyone is presumed heterosexual until demonstrated otherwise. But this word need not apply only to the LGBT community. In some situations, a heterosexual may feel the need to come out about their identity as well.
  • Crossdresser ~ Individual who dresses in the “opposite” gender clothing for a variety of reasons, sometimes for sexual pleasure. Crossdressing is not indicative of sexual orientation. This term replaces the sometimes pejorative term transvestite.
  • CSW ~ Special Commission on the Status of Women. 58th session 2014 theme: ”Challenges and achievements in the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals for women and girls”
  • Diversity ~ An approach to equalities that seeks to celebrate people's differences.
  • Drag ~ dragging up (prep. v int) Cross dressing; usually for entertainment purposes.
  • Drag King ~ A lesbian who performs using exaggerated forms of masculine attire and attitudes, usually for performance or entertainment purposes.
  • Drag Queen ~ A gay man who performs using exaggerated forms of feminine attire and attitudes, usually for performance or entertainment purposes.
  • Down Low ~ A term used to refer to men who maintain a heterosexual identity and lifestyle in their daily lives, but engage in same-sex intercourse as a secret part of their lives.
  • Dyke ~ A derogatory slur for lesbians. Reclaimed by some as a term of pride.
  • Equality ~ The concept that all people should be treated as equals and be given the same political, economic, social and civil rights.
  • FAAB ~ Female Assigned At Birth
  • Fag(got) ~ A derogatory slur for gay men. Reclaimed by some as a term of pride. Derived from the word faggot (literally "small bundle of sticks"), an allusion to the Inquisition-era practice of burning people at the stake for suspected homosexual practices.
  • Fag Hag ~ A term primarily used to describe women who prefer the social company of gay men. While this term is claimed in an affirmative manner by some, it is largely regarded as derogatory.
  • Family ~ A real loving family does not need a female mother and a male father. In-vitro fertilisation and progress in adoption legislation has led to a growth in families with same-sex parents. Children in western society are coming out as LGB and presenting as T earlier in life, so many families are bringing up children they know to be lesbian, gay, bisexual or trans. This needs to be reflected in school curricula and resources.
  • FTM ~ An abbreviation for female-to-male transsexual. This person most likely prefers masculine pronouns.
  • GATE ~ Global Action for Trans* Equality (GATE).
  • Gay ~ A man who has significant sexual and or romantic attractions to other men, or who identifies as a member of the gay community. At times, "gay" is used to refer to all people, regardless of sex, who have their primary sexual and or romantic attractions to people of the same sex. Lesbians and bisexuals may feel excluded by this word.
  • Gender ~ A binary sociological construct defining the collection of characteristics that are culturally associated with maleness or femaleness;masculine and feminine make up gender just as male and female comprise sex.
  • Gender Binary ~ The idea that there are only two genders – male/female or man/woman and that a person must be strictly gendered as either/or.
  • Gender Dysphoria ~ The feeling that one's gender is different from his/her birth sex. A recognized medical condition.
  • Gender Euphoria ~ A term coined by trans community members to refer to the happiness and joy of openly and proudly living in your preferred gender role, an antidote to the pathologizing and bleak connotations of “gender dysphoria”
  • Gender Expression ~ This is an individual’s external gender-related appearance (including clothing) and behaviour (including interests and mannerisms). A person may have masculine, feminine, or androgynous aspects of their appearance or behavior.
  • Gender Identity ~ How one perceives oneself – as a man, a woman, or otherwise.
  • Gender-neutral ~ Nondiscriminatory language usage that can apply equal to people of any gender identity. “Spouse” and “partner” are gender-neutral alternatives to the gender-specific words “husband,” “wife,” “boyfriend” and “girlfriend.” The use of the gender-neutral pronouns “ze” (instead of she/he) and “hir” (instead of his/her) are preferred by some as a way to inclusive of all genders in language use.
  • Gender Reassignment (surgery) ~ medical intervention to change one's physical sex, including genitalia. Sometimes it is called Gender affirmation. This surgery is available to adults throughout Europe.
  • Gender Role ~ Norms of expected behavior for men and women assigned primarily on the basis of biological sex; a sociological construct which varies from culture to culture.
  • Genderqueer ~ A gender identity that rejects the notion that all genders can be described on the masculine/feminine binary.
  • GDX ~ Gender Dynamix
  • Gynephilia ~ refers to the sexual attraction of women or feminity
  • Hen ~ a proposed gender-neutral personal pronoun instead of he and she in Sweden
  • Hermaphrodite ~ An out-of-date and offensive term for an intersexed person.
  • Heteronormativity ~ Processes through which social institutions and policies reinforce the notion that there are only two possibilities for sex, gender, and sexual attraction ~ male/masculine/attracted to women and female/feminine/attracted to men.
  • Heterosexism ~ The individual person, group, or institutional norms and behaviors that result from the assumption that all people are heterosexual. The system of oppression, which assumes that heterosexuality is inherently normal and superior, negates LBGT peoples' lives and relationships.
  • Heterosexual ~ A person (male or female) who has significant sexual and or romantic attractions to primarily members of the other sex.
  • Hir ~ Gender neutral pronouns that can be used instead of his/her.
  • Homophobia ~ The fear and hatred of or the discomfort with people who love and sexually desire members of the same sex. Homophobic reactions often lead to intolerance, bigotry, and violence against anyone not acting within heterosexual norms. Because most LGBT people are raised in the same society as heterosexuals, they learn the same beliefs and stereotypes prevalent in the dominant society, leading to a phenomenon known as "internalized homophobia."
  • Homosexual ~ The formal or clinical term that was coined in the field of psychology, sometimes meaning only "gay male," but at times encompasses lesbians and occasionally bisexuals. The word is often associated with the proposition that same sex attractions are a mental disorder, and is therefore distasteful to some people.
  • Inclusive Language ~ Use of gender non-specific language to avoid imposing the limiting assumption of heterosexuality and to present an open social climate for non-heterosexuals.
  • Internalized Homophobia ~ Experience of shame, aversion, or self-hatred in reaction to one’s own feelings of attraction for a person of the same sex.
  • IGLHRC ~ International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC)
  • Intersex ~ Term used for a variety of medical conditions in which a person is born with chromosomes, genitalia, and/or secondary sexual characteristics that are inconsistent with the typical definition of a male or female body. The term disorders of sex development (DSD) also describes these conditions. Replaces the inaccurate term “hermaphrodite.”
  • It ~ This is demeaning and does not validate their identity or respect them as a person. Derogatory for intersex
  • Lesbian ~ A woman who has significant sexual and or romantic attractions to other women, or who identifies as a member of the lesbian community. Bisexual women may not feel included by this term.
  • LGBT ~ An acronym for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender. At times, a Q will be added for 'Queer' and/or 'Questioning', an A for 'Ally', and/or a TS for 'Two Spirit'.
  • LGBTIGNC ~ LGBTI is an acronym commonly used, however, the Iranti-org focus is on transgender, lesbian gender and non-conforming persons
  • Lifestyle ~ This is a word that is often used outside the LGBT community to describe living life as an LGBT person, i.e. the "gay lifestyle." Many people do not find this word particularly appropriate or positive because it seems to trivialize personal identity, as well as not make space for the large variety of lifestyles that lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender people live.
  • MAAB ~ Male Assigned At Birth.
  • Metrosexual ~ First used in 1994 by British journalist Mark Simpson, who coined the term to refer to an urban, heterosexual male with a strong aesthetic sense, who spends a great deal of time and money on his appearance and lifestyle. This term can be perceived as derogatory because it reinforces stereotypes that all gay men are fashion-conscious and materialistic.
  • MSM ~ An abbreviation for men who have sex with men. This term emphasizes the behavior, rather than the identities of the individuals involved.
  • MTF ~ An abbreviation for male-to-female transsexual. This person most likely prefers feminine pronouns.
  • Neutrois ~ is a term used to describe persons who are agender and also seek to be without the physical characteristics of their sex (e.g. genitalia, breasts, body and facial hair). Some people on the forums may identify as FtN (Female to Neutrois) or MtN (Male to Neutrois) in a similar way that some people in the trans* community identify as FtM or MtF.
  • No gender/Non-Conforming ~ is a term used to describe a person without gender. This person can be any physical sex, but their body does not necessarily correspond with their lack of gender identity. Often, these people are not concerned with their physical sex, but some may seek to look androgynous. Sometimes, an agendered person is also neutrois. Synonymous for agender
  • Nonmonosexual ~ People who have romantic, sexual, or affectional desire for more than one gender. Bisexuality is the most well-known form of non-monosexuality.
  • Nonsexual ~ Considered a more appropriate term than “asexual,” a person who has no evident sex or sex organs. In usage it may refer to a person who is not sexually active, or not sexually attracted to other persons.
  • Omnigendered ~ Possessing all genders; exhibiting cultural characteristics of male and female. The term is specifically used to refute the concept of only two genders.
  • Omnisexual ~ A person who recognizes more than two genders and experiences the human need for warmth, affection, and/or love from a person of any gender. (Synonymous with Pansexual)
  • Oppression ~ The exercise of authority or power in a burdensome, cruel, or unjust manner.
  • Outing ~ Revealing that someone is LGB or T against their wishes.
  • Pansexual ~ A person who is emotionally, romantically, sexually, affectionately, or relationally attracted to people regardless of their gender identity or biological sex. Use of the term usually signals a repudiation of the concept of binary sexes (a concept implied by “bisexual”).
  • Partner ~ Primary domestic partner or spousal relationship among same gender couples.
  • Pass ~ To represent one’s self as a member of a social group other than one’s own. For example, a lesbian who passes for straight, or a biological man who is perceived to be a woman.
  • Pink Triangle ~ During World War II, the Nazis interred gay men and lesbians as well as Jewish people, gypsies and others. In the concentration camps, each group was forced to wear an insignia to mark them as a member of a particular group – the pink triangle for gay men. Some have taken this very powerful reminder and incentive for change.
  • Pomosexual ~ a person who shuns labels such as heterosexual that define individuals by their sexual preferences
  • Rainbow ~ Emblem of gay pride, most commonly displayed in a flag format sometimes referred to as a "freedom flag". Red: life; orange: healing; yellow: sunlight; green: nature; blue: serenity/harmony; and violet: spirit. Designed by Gilbert Baker in 1978, is similar to, but not the same as the peace flag of seven colours, based on a design by Picasso, which was first flown in a protest in Italy in 1961.
  • Queer ~ Originally a derogatory slur, it has recently been reclaimed by some to be an inclusive word for all of those within the sexual minority community. Because of the original derogatory nature of the word, it is not necessarily accepted by all.
  • Questioning ~ The process of examining one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity. Can be used as an adjective.
  • RFSL ~ Riksförbundet för homosexuellas, bisexuellas och transpersoners rättigheter (RFSL—The Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Rights) is a non-profit organization that works with and for the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people (LGBT). It is non-partisan and not affiliated with any religious organization.
  • Same-Gender Loving (SGL) ~ How some African-Americans prefer to describe their sexual orientation, seeing “gay” and “lesbian” as primarily white terms. “Same-sex loving” is also in use.
  • Sexual Orientation ~ The direction of one's sexual interest toward members of certain sexes. Can involve fantasy, behavior, and self-identification; a person's general makeup or alignment in terms of partner attraction. Includes (among others) a same-sex orientation, male-female orientation, a bisexual orientation, and a pansexual orientation.
  • SHE ~ Social, Health and Empowerment. Feminist Collective of Transgender and Intersex Women of Africa
  • Sie ~ A non-gender specific pronoun used instead of “she” and “he”
  • Stereotype ~ A fixed, commonly held notion or image of a person or group, based on an oversimplification of some observed behaviours or traits. Generally, stereotypes are negative. Children are usually expected to conform to gender stereotypes.
  • Tranny ~ Whether or not someone identifies as Trans, calling them a “tranny” can be extremely offensive. This may be a term that people within the community use and reclaim for themselves but it should not be used as a joke without consent.
  • Trans ~ Someone who does not conform to predominant gender roles.
  • Transgender ~ An umbrella term for those individuals whose gender identity does not match with that assigned for their physical sex. Includes transsexuals, both operative & non-operative, bigendered people, intersexed, & transgenderists.
  • Transition ~ This term is primarily used to refer to the process a gender variant person undergoes when changing their bodily appearance either to be more congruent with the gender/sex they feel themselves to be and/or to be in harmony with their preferred gender expression.
  • Transphobia ~ Fear of, hatred of, or discomfort with people who are transgender or otherwise gender non-normative.
  • Transvestite ~ someone who dresses in clothes associated with the opposite sex to that in which they were born. This may be public or private; occasional or full- time. Also called cross-dressing.
  • Two-Spirit ~ Contemporary term chosen to describe Native American and Canadian First Nation people who identify with a third gender, implying a masculine and a feminine spirit in one body. Replaces the offensive term berdache.
  • Visibility ~ How visible a group is among the wider public. Young LGBT people often feel 'invisible' because they don't see or hear of anyone like themselves.
  • WPATH ~ World Professional Association for Transgender Health
  • WSW ~ An abbreviation for women who have sex with women. This term emphasizes the behavior, rather than the identities of the individuals

 

 

 

some source Glossaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 
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