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ACTIVIST PROFILES: FUNERAL

 

Funeral of Malume, Gentle Giant

 

Swaziland, 22 September 2015

Xolile Malume Mabuza's funeral was held in Swaziland 6 September 2015. The Gentle Giant known to all as Malume, was memorialised by LGBTI activists from across the continent.

Malume funeral - Usuthu Mission Anglican Church
Usuthu Mission Anglican Church couldn’t accommodate everyone who came to pay their last respects to Malume. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza                

 11 September 2015
Memorial service of the late Xolile “Malume” Mabuza took place on the 11th of September 2015  Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

Malume funeral - video screening about Malume by Iranti-org
In memory of Malume’s great work, Iranti-org and partners screen a video honoring Malume. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

Malume funeral - Usuthu Anglican Church's pastor spoke about Malume as parent and grandparent
The Pastor of the Usuthu Anglican Church spoke about Malume’s legacy  as a parent and grandparent. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

Malume funeral - Mfuno Dlamini, Malume's son, paid his last respects
Malume’s son, Mfundo Dlamini with his daughter paying their last respects.
Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

Malume funeral - Malume's memorial service
Memorial service and prayers. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza                                                                    Malume funeral - DUPS Funeral Home and Crematrium
DUPS Funeral Home and Crematorium where Malume’s final farewell service was conducted. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

Malume funeral - Coffin taken into DUPS Funeral Home

Close family were asked to say their last goodbye as the coffin was taken into the crematorium. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

Left to right: Neo Musangi, Veli Madawu, Zethu Matebeni, Tshepo Kgositau, and Jholer Timbo - Malume funeral
Left to right: Neo Musangi, Veli Madawu, Zethu Matebeni, Tshepo Kgositau, and Jholer Timbo standing with heavy hearts as the coffin is wheeled into the crematorium. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

Left to right: Tshepo Kgositau of Gender DynamiX, and Veli Madau of Rock of Hope - Malume's funeral
Left to right: Tshepo Kgositau of Gender DynamiX, and Veli Madau of Rock of Hope comfort each other. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

Sibusiso Kheswa, director at Gender DynamiX,, and Jabu Pereira, Director at Iranti-org, in conversation with Malume’s sister (Phumele). Malume's funeral
Sibusiso Kheswa, director at Gender DynamiX,, and Jabu Pereira, Director at Iranti-org, in conversation with Malume’s sister, Phumele. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

LGBTI activists from across the region came to pay their last respects to Malume, The Gentle Giant
LGBTI activists from across the region came to pay their last respects to Malume, The Gentle Giant. Photo by: Ayanda Msiza

 

 

 

 

 

OBITUARY

WE HONOUR MALUME

by Iranti Media

Malume is Xolile Mabuza's preferred name. He is his chosen gender pronoun. A proud Transgender rights activist and an overall human rights activist sadly passed away on the 13th September 2015. He was the founder and director of Rock of Hope and LGBTI human rights organisation in Swaziland. Iranti-org produced this tribute along with friends of Malume. there were just so many tributes we not able to add them all, but we hope this tribute honors his memory and the love he had for each of us. RIP Malume, you are sorely missed.

 

Click to enlarge.

Xolile Mabuza and Newo Musangi

Xolile Mabuza and Neo Musangi

Xolile Mabuza and Neo Musangi

Neo Musangi and Xolile Mabuza

 

Activist Obituary

malume: a question mark

Kenya, 14 September 2015

“what happened?”

 

(so easy. so useless a question).

 

somewhere in Manzini and Mbabane the sun rises. without you.kuthwe us’Ezwilini.

 

birds continue to chirp in Nairobi’s arboretum. this morning the
construction workers cat-called me. maybe my face hasn’t registered
grief. who cares that i am in mourning?

 

(but who am i to mourn you?)

 

did the stars hide in mourning last night?
did your neighbor’s dog stop barking?
did the rooster not crow this morning?
did the tellers at Shoprite close/ this morning?
shall your being be respected on the day they bury you?

 

lovers kiss each other in the dark. forbidden. mouths that never
uttered your name.

 

malume; you who suffered from— and died of – death.

 

ufike kanjani? ngubani ixesha khona?

 

i will stop by you, to hold you

 

catch my breath if i can’t stop time.

 

and

 

FEELING FABULOUS:
A TRIBUTE TO XOLILE MABUZA

by Neo Musangi, co-founder of Iranti-org


Nairobi, 14 September 2015

I have been back in Nairobi for almost three years; my understanding of Nguni languages might be waning but I do hope I can start this with a name: Xolile; one who is/has been forgiven. I barely knew him by that name.  I never called him Xolile. Most of us never did. Xolile became Malume and often called himself the ‘Gentle Giant’ and gentle he was.

 

There is always a lot to say when people die. The work of the eulogy is to list good deeds. It is to summarise a life. Given, there is a lot to say about Malume. He was a jolly good man. There are tributes flowing on Facebook from individuals who knew him for a long time and from others who only met him once or twice. There are organisations sending in messages from across Southern Africa and the entire region. Indeed what a loss!

 

But I choose to speak about pictures. Malume loved pictures. He took pictures all the time. He took pictures of himself, of fountains and of other people. Even people who met Malume once have pictures with him. As I go through Malume’s Facebook page I realize just how important it was for him to capture moments. How important it was for him to be honest. To feel and to express his moments of “feeling fabulous with…”. Malume smiled, he smiled a lot. He laughed too, heartily and often.  Malume loved, and loved deeply. He spoke of love as a blessing. He spoke of people as blessings. He spoke about his partner a lot. Where that talk was is silence and while we mourn as a movement, as a people, someone is mourning Malume differently. Yes, Zethu Matebeni is right: “some things are not meant to be experienced alone. Mourning is one of them”. Malume’s wedding was going to be in Kenya, he told me in June 2015. That wedding won’t be. Perhaps this will be a wedding of a different kind. It will be a wedding of silent sobs and grief across the LGB & TI movement and individuals across the world. It will be a celebration of a life and a regret of a single death of a person who lived in, and with, so many souls. It will be an imagination of what Malume’s absence means individually and collectively.

 

Thank you Malume for sharing so many bits of you with us. Thank you for being you.  And thank you for saying: “Emotional release comes at about the time it begins to dawn upon us how dreadful this loss is. Sometimes without warning there Wells up within us an uncontrollable urge to express our grief. It's a good thing to allow ourselves to express the emotions as we have tear glands right!” (August 19).

 

Without warning, there has welled up within us an uncontrollable urge to express our grief, but within that we find only good memories of you and sithi sixolele if we don’t laugh enough today. Uhambe kahle our Rock of Hope, comrade, leader, and friend.

 

 

 
 
 

 

 
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